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Friday, May 4

  1. page This Week's Homework edited This Week's Homework: ... - 1) Work page Math work - ELA skills "Goofus" error an…
    This Week's Homework:
    ...
    - 1) Work pageMath work - ELA skills"Goofus" error analysis
    2) Read for funfun.
    Tuesday - 1) Work page - ELA skillsMath work
    2) Read for funfun.
    Wednesday and Thursday: No homework, due to MCAS testing. Please get a good night's sleep, eat a hearty breakfast, and bring two snacks - 1) Work page - ELA skills
    2) Finish informational essay
    Thursday - 1) Work page - ELA skills
    2) Read
    one for before the testing and one for funafterwards.
    Friday - play, sing, draw, read for fun!
    (view changes)
    11:10 am
  2. page home edited May 4, 2018 Dear Families, I have enjoyed the opportunity to meet with families in conferences…

    May 4, 2018
    Dear Families,
    I have enjoyed the opportunity to meet with families in conferences in March and April. If you have not yet scheduled your conference, please let me know your availability, so we may meet together. I always enjoy sharing students’ progress with families.
    We have been busy in these last few weeks. In Reading and Writing, students have begun a new project: a book review. Students have all picked a book that they would like to read and review in writing. When all students have finished their book review, I’ll collate all of the reviews into a big “Summer Reading Recommendation” packet, so students may read their peers’ recommendations and perhaps be inspired to read some of the books which have been “advertised.”
    Math MCAS testing in Grade 3 is scheduled for this THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, May 10 and 11. MCAS is an untimed test, so students will be allowed all the time they need, within the confines of the school day. Like the English/Language Arts tests a few weeks ago, the tests will be taken on computers. Hopefully this will feel like “old news” for Team1, having successfully navigated the first two ELA sessions. We’ll mention the next sessions this week briefly, and again build a “tool kit” of strategies to help students feel comfortable during the actual testing. Again, please join me in helping your child realize the many strengths that he or she brings to the testing. ***It would be helpful to encourage your children to get a good night’s sleep and eat a hearty breakfast, and to bring two snacks - one for before the test, and one for afterwards. There will be no homework on Wednesday or Thursday. Please let me know if you have questions, or if your child may be feeling especially anxious about the testing.
    Students have also enjoyed Math lessons in Fractions and are just beginning their work with Metric measurement. This past week, students used pattern blocks to find equivalent fractions, to find which fractions combined to make one whole, and then played a game in which they raced a partner to “build” several hexagon “wholes” from fractions. In addition, students have been learning to find a fraction of a set by drawing and coloring sets of balls, and by solving real world problems. Last, students learned about the difference between grams and kilograms, learned about their place in the Metric “Family” (as opposed to the U.S. Customary “Family,” held a gram and a kilogram’s worth of weight in their hands, used a pan balance to weigh classroom objects using grams, and estimated the weights in grams or kilograms of several objects.
    In Social Studies, we have been learning bout the events leading up to the Revolutionary War. Students just finished our exciting historical fiction book, The First Shot. We began our formal study of the war by completing an anticipation guide - a set of statements which students rated as true or false, based on their knowledge before reading about the events leading up to the war. We are now reading nonfiction test about the causes of the Revolutionary War, about Loyalists and Patriots, and we have learned about the Boston Massacre (and Paul Revere’s famous copper etching of that event, somewhat altered in order to convince Boston’s colonists to sympathize with the Patriots!). We will continue our work, stopping to look back at our anticipation guides and see what is really true about these historical events! Thank you for your help in returning your child’s permission slip, so that everyone may enjoy our upcoming field trips and learn more about the Revolutionary War.
    Our Science work has involved learning about the force of Gravity! Students participated in a STEAM engineering challenge to build a cart which could roll a certain distance using plastic disks, index cards, binder clips, plastic axles, straws, popsicle sticks, and tongue depressors - along with a lot of tape! I was impressed with each group’s efforts to plan, build, test, and then rebuild and retest their carts, until they met the challenge, given the materials allowed and the constraints they had! To prepare for this engineering event, students enjoyed lessons which involved rolling first cups, and then disks and axles down a ramp. They were given different challenges to change the movement of their cups and wheel-and-axle systems. This preparation helped them as they figured out how to build their carts; at first, some groups attempted to tape a wheel-and-axle system onto an index card, but they realized quickly that this set-up made it so the wheels would not turn, but merely slide. They then set to work with the binder clips, straws, and tongue depressors, finding several different ways to help the axles turn freely as the cart traveled the required distance! It was exciting to see their ideas set in motion (literally)!
    **Though we are not yet at the year’s end, our pencil supply and tissue supply are dwindling. If it is possible for your family to send in a box or two of either of these crucial items, I would so appreciate your donations! Thank you so much!
    Enjoy the week!
    Sincerely,
    Kristin Murphy

    April 4, 2018
    Dear Families,
    (view changes)
    11:08 am

Wednesday, April 4

  1. page home edited ... Spring has sprung! I hope you are enjoying the more temperate snow-free weather. Team 1 is hap…
    ...
    Spring has sprung! I hope you are enjoying the more temperate snow-free weather. Team 1 is happy to be outside consistently, after our rainy and snowy days. Please help your child to make a good choice when dressing in the next few weeks, as we are likely to have some colder days mixed in with the warmer days. It might be best to dress in layers, as our heat sometimes doesn't adjust for the weather in the first warmer days of spring... Thanks so much for helping your third grader dress so he or she is comfortable!
    We have been busy in the last few weeks. In Reading and Writing, students have begun to learn about how to write an informational essay, after reading one or two texts. We are using the “TREE” mnemonic from our opinion writing to guide us, but we will eventually learn a new informational mnemonic - TIDE. I’ll provide more details about this mnemonic and students’ informational writing as the spring progresses. They have enjoyed sharing their own drafts with the class, as well as examining other “exemplar” essays, to make sure all of the “parts of the recipe” are included in the essay. Our reading has focused on answering comprehension questions, in preparation for next week’s MCAS state testing.
    ...
    Wednesday and
    Thursday.
    Thursday. MCAS is
    ...
    of May.
    Please
    Please let me
    Our work in Cursive handwriting will be exciting this week, as we have almost completed the whole lower case alphabet! Students will take the last weeks of the year to learn the capital letters, which are easily learned after all the lower case practice! Soon, we will have the fun of writing in cursive and knowing every letter!
    Students have also enjoyed Math lessons in both Geometry and Fractions. I have chosen to teach these units concurrently (three days of fractions per week and two days of Geometry), since the two sets of concepts so directly relate to one another. Students have been involved with solving a "Four Triangle Challenge," in which they joined four paper triangles in many different ways to try and find every possible different polygon. Students worked together to check to see if their newly formed polygons were congruent to an already-discovered polygon ( learning what the term "congruent" means in the process). They then traced these polygons onto large paper and rotated their shapes around one vertex (learning the terms "vertex" and "vertices" and "rotation") to make a guessing game for the whole grade on our bulletin board. Students passing by the bulletin board will be able to try and guess which of the polygons on our chart made each student's rotation design, and which vertex on that polygon was the vertex around which the students rotated the polygon. Another project was learning to fold an origami-style "geometry vocabulary book," during which I taught students several geometric terms, and then writing some geometric terms in each of the resulting folded "sections" of the book. I have chosen to do this project each year, beca\use I want students to really WANT to open up their accordion-style origami book to find the meaning of their terms. Students also used a set of fifteen quadrilaterals to solve several Riddles, with three or four clues. They narrowed down their quadrilateral cards with the addition of each clue, and finally ended with one card - the "mystery quadrilateral." Students will continue with this project by writing their own riddles. Our fraction work this week has included a fantastic "Fraction Museum!" Groups of two or three students had fun folding string into equal fractional parts, pouring colored water into cups to represent their fraction exhibit's fraction, folding construction paper of various sizes, and splitting up homemade play dough into equal parts. We will display each exhibit (the thirds, fourths, sixths, sevenths, eighths, and tenths...) and student on Friday will walk around the “museum,” drawing and completing related work - noticing the relative size of each fraction at each “exhibit!” We have also made our own "fraction strips" for comparing fractions, and we are beginning to draw and use number lines with fractions. Soon, we will enjoy a bean bag game with fractions on a number line and bowls and cups of various sizes!
    (view changes)
    12:47 pm
  2. page home edited April 10, 2017 4, 2018 Dear Families, ... enjoying the more temperate weather this week…

    April 10, 20174, 2018
    Dear Families,
    ...
    enjoying the more temperate weather this week.snow-free weather. Team 1
    ...
    to be outside,outside consistently, after our week of rainy weather.and snowy days. Please help
    ...
    few weeks. Our work in Science has centered around our RocksIn Reading and Minerals unit. StudentsWriting, students have tested "mystery minerals"begun to learn about how to write an informational essay, after reading one or two texts. We are using scientific tools such asthe “TREE” mnemonic from our opinion writing to guide us, but we will eventually learn a "streak plate." They completed several tests on six different mystery mineral samples. For example, students learnednew informational mnemonic - TIDE. I’ll provide more details about this mnemonic and students’ informational writing as the "Mohs Scale of Hardness" by testingspring progresses. They have enjoyed sharing their sample by trying to scratch it firstown drafts with a fingernail, then with a penny, and last - if these two tests didn't make a scratch - with a nail (while supervised). They then assigned a number to the mineral sample on the Mohs scale,class, as well as examining other “exemplar” essays, to indicate how hard it was. After students completedmake sure all of the tests, we revealed“parts of the characteristics of each mineralrecipe” are included in the essay. Our reading has focused on answering comprehension questions, in preparation for next week’s MCAS state testing.
    MCAS testing in Grade 3 will begin in next week, on Wednesday
    and its name. Students guessed which of their mineral samples matched each of my mineral profiles, and they discovered the identities of
    Thursday. MCAS is an untimed test, so students will be allowed
    all six minerals. We also rehearsed and performed a "Layers of the Earth" play. Each student was part of one oftime they need, within the four main layersconfines of the Earth. There was a speaking partschool day. Typically, most students work for 60 - 90 minutes. The tests will be taken on computers, which is new for third grade students, though students have practiced keyboarding in school and a moving part.at home. We performed the play outdoors, with every layer speakinghave also completed some practice questions and moving at once! In addition,some specific review to help students have learned from a local geologist from Wayland.when they are tested. This past week, Dr. Barbara Sheffels, a resident of Wayland, generously donated her time to visit every third grade classroom three times. Students learnwe have been talking about what a geologist does, examined some tools which a geologist uses during field work, looked at pictures of land forms and solved a puzzle related"tools" to put in one's tool kit; I plan to keep the pictures, learned about how geologists do their work,mood light, positive, and reviewed the layers of the Earth. Dr. Sheffels also helped studentsas stress-free as possible, and I ask that you try to understanddo the rock cycle and the three wayssame at home. Please join me in which rocks are formed, withnot worrying overly about the use of several dynamic pictures and an arrow chart. Students constructed their charts, and then used themtesting, but simply encouraging your child to help make good choices about what kind of rock was being formed when given a trivia cardread for Dr. Sheffels' original game (Trivial Pursuit style). It wasfun, get a fun way to learn about the three kinds of rocks,good night's sleep and how one type of rock caneat a hearty breakfast, as there will be transformed by forces intono written homework on the other two kinds of rocks. Students were exctied to learn aboutnights preceding the Earth from a professional geologist!
    In Reading and Writing, students have learned about how
    MCAS. It would also be helpful to write an informational essay, after reading one ormake sure your child brings two texts. They learned the mnemonic "TIDE" which helps themmorning snacks to organize their essays. "T" standsschool - one for before the topic sentence, "I" stands for important ideas, "D" stands for details which help them to explain the ideas,test, if needed, and "E" standsone for ending. Studentsafterwards. I have practiced marking up the text while readingreminded students that every child in order to look for information to answer a question. They practiced reading to a partner while their partner made up gestures which related toMassachusetts takes these tests, and all of the text. Then they switched roles. After taking some notesstate's fourth graders and organizingalive, well, and happy after having taken their thinking,third grade tests. I've told students answered the question in essay form. Last, we used "exemplars" which were scored from 1I expect that this will continue to 4 (4 being the most developed writing) to show students how they could improve their essays.happen this year! :) Students learned how to communicatewill take the ideas which related toMath sections of the prompt, how to find the verbstest in the question tosecond week of May.
    Please let me
    know whatif you have questions, or if your child might feel especially anxious about the question was asking them to do, and learned how to plan their essay using the TIDE mnemonic. They have enjoyed sharing their own writing as well!testing.
    Our work
    ...
    Cursive handwriting has beenwill be exciting this
    ...
    we have almost completed the
    ...
    every letter!
    Our work in

    Students have also enjoyed
    Math in the past few weeks has involved lessons in
    ...
    passing by mustthe bulletin board will be able to try and
    ...
    will continue this week with this
    ...
    fraction work this week has included a
    ...
    up homemade playdoughplay dough into equal parts. We then displayedwill display each exhibit (the halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths, sevenths, eighths, and tenths...) and students walkedstudent on Friday will walk around the museum,“museum,” drawing and
    ...
    of each fraction!fraction at each “exhibit!” We have
    ...
    Studies study thus far has involved locatinglearning about Massachusetts - its state symbols, its government, and some of its history. Thank you to the various major rivers, mountains, reservoirs, cities, towns, bodies of water, and other physical and political featuresparent chaperones who joined us on our Massachusetts maps. I was thrilled with how students used their "quiz kits"recent visit to practice each location - and many times the spellings for extra credit! Students' work on their tests was superb! We did this background work, and now we are readingState House! Students also have finished a group read-aloud of the book, Nicholas: A
    ...
    these landmarks were, after their test!),were), and imparts important history of Massachusetts.historical facts from Massachusetts’ history. Nicholas also
    ...
    animal voices!
    Another job we have done this week is
    After a pause to become familiar with how to take the online MCAS test on computer, whichcomplete some science lessons, students will do when they return from April vacation. Our English/Language Arts testing days are Wednesday, Thursday,learn more about Massachusetts’ geography (and will remember the story of Nicholas and Friday afterhis journey), locating the break (4/26, 4/27,various major rivers, mountains, reservoirs, cities, towns, bodies of water, and 4/28). I ask parents that - as always - you help your child get to bed at a reasonable hourother physical and eat a good breakfast before each day next week. I talked today withpolitical features on our Massachusetts maps.
    In Science,
    students and told them that they were ready, and reminded them that many fourth graders have taken the test last yearenjoyed several experiments with magnets - both with a partner, and HAVE LIVED TO TELL ABOUT IT! I had students laughing at my silly recounting about how some students even whispered to me afterone experiment demonstration (which caused a wonderful group “OHHH!!!” when the test that they actually LIKED it. Please remind your child that they are ready, and only needmagnet tied to do their best to completea string moved away from the work. Our tests this year are untimed, so students may relax and have enough time to completemagnet on the work to the bestleg of their ability. Students will takea chair, and there was a visible gap between the Math sections ofmagnets, making it look like the testmagnet was hanging in mid air. This surprising event helped us discuss and learn more about magnetic fields, and about the first weekforce of May.
    Last, I want
    magnetism. This week, students have been learning more about magnetism, and also about gravity, by reading and taking “word web” notes while reading a non-fiction article about these two forces. This “research” will help us to wishdo another magnetic experiment and a Happy Passover to students who celebrate. There will be no homework tonight, duegravity experiment. I can’t wait to make corny jokes about the holiday. I will assign homework Tuesday through Thursday nights, but families who celebrate tomorrow night“force” being with us as well may just let me know by note or email that they will be celebrating, and we can make other arrangements.experiment!
    Again, thanks
    ...
    third grader! Enjoy the week.
    Sincerely,
    Kristin Murphy
    (view changes)
    12:47 pm
  3. page This Week's Homework edited Team 1's Homework for January 2-5: Tuesday This Week's Homework: Monday - Missing Side Area h…
    Team 1's Homework for January 2-5:
    Tuesday
    This Week's Homework:
    Monday
    - Missing Side Area homework
    Read for fun
    Wednesday
    1) Work page - Perimeter homework
    Read
    ELA skills
    2) Read
    for fun
    Thursday - Area/Perimeter homework
    Read for fun
    Friday - no homework
    Team 1’s Homework for the week of Oct. 23rd
    Extra Credit - Complete the writing prompt about our Bats passage!
    Monday -
    1) Reading work - Please read the text (Bats) once to yourself and once out loud to an adult. Then, highlight any"silver-dollar"words (interesting, unusual words) and any words which are new to you and “code” your passage, using our “cell phone” code. (Due tomorrow)
    2) Please begin the Array Card preparations (directions are on the packet). *This math assignment is not due until Wednesday.

    Tuesday -
    1) Reading work
    1) Work page - Please read the text once out loud to an adult. Then, complete the question page. (Due tomorrow)ELA skills
    2) Please finish the Array Card preparations (directions are on the packet). (Due tomorrow).Read for fun
    Wednesday -
    1) Reading work
    1) Work page - Please read the passage to an animal or a stuffed animal. Then complete the questions. (Due tomorrow)ELA skills
    2) Math work (This math packet is due on Thursday.)Finish informational essay
    Thursday -
    1) Reading work
    1) Work page - Please read the passage in your head. Then complete the questions. (Due tomorrow)ELA skills
    2) Math work (Due tomorrow)
    EXTRA CREDIT - Complete the writing prompt about our bats passage!
    Team 1’s Homework
    Read for the week of Oct. 2nd
    Homework Week 6: Team 1's Homework for the Week of 10/10
    Please work only 30 minutes per night!
    Extra Credit
    fun
    Friday
    - Any/all levels of the “Hang Out Inside My Piano” problem packet!
    Tuesday, Oct. 10:
    1) Math fact practice: Please practice the page which is BEST for you. Please bring in your page tomorrow.
    2) Please
    play, sing, draw, read ALOUD the book you chose for your Kindergarten buddy for fifteen minutes. Next, please have an adult sign your page to show that you read aloud to someone at your house. Please read for only fifteen minutes.
    Wednesday, Oct. 12:
    1) Math problem solving practice: Please remember to use the problem solving steps we used in class! Please work ONLY 15 minutes. Please bring in your page tomorrow.
    2) Please read ALOUD the book you chose for your Kindergarten buddy for fifteen minutes. If you didn't finish reading the book aloud yesterday, please begin where you left off yesterday. Next, please have an adult sign your page to show that you read aloud to someone at your house. Please read for only fifteen minutes.
    Thursday, Oct. 13:
    1) Math problem solving practice. Please remember to use the problem solving steps we used in class! Please work ONLY 15 minutes. Please bring in your page tomorrow.
    2) Please read ALOUD the book you chose for your Kindergarten buddy for fifteen minutes. If you didn't finish reading the book aloud yesterday, please begin where you left off yesterday. Otherwise, please read from the beginning of the book. Next, please have an adult sign your page to show that you read aloud to someone at your house. Please read for only fifteen minutes.
    Reading Signature Page:
    Monday, Oct. 2:
    1) Social Studies page
    2) Please read at least 5 poems aloud to someone at home. Next, choose one poem you like the best. Write its title and the poet's name on your "Making Friends with a Poem" page. Write YOUR name on the line which says "Illustrated by" - you'll be illustrating your poem this week!
    Tuesday, Oct. 3:
    1) Please play one of the online computer games listed on the homework page (and sent electronically). Then, please write the name of the game you played and have an adult sign to say that they supervisedyou as you played the game. Only 15 minutes of play is needed. Please bring in your homework game form.
    2) Please copy your poem exactly as it is printed on the page onto your "Making Friends with a Poem" page. Bring in your page.
    Wednesday, Oct. 4:
    1) Please play one of the online computer games listed on the homework page (and sent electronically). Then, please write the name of the game you played and have an adult sign to show that you played the game.
    Only 15 minutes of play is needed. Please bring in your homework game form.
    2) Please use crayons (and a pencil, if you like) to draw an illustration on your page to go along with your poem.
    Please bring in your homework.
    Thursday, Oct. 5:
    1) Please play one of the online computer games listed on the homework page (and sent electronically). Then, please write the name of the game you played and have an adult sign to show that you played the game.
    Only 15 minutes of play is needed. Please bring in your homework game form.
    2) Please practice reading your poem out loud three times, so you can read it to a small group of students tomorrow
    during reading time.
    Team 1's Homework for Sept. 25 - Sept. 29**
    Monday: 1) Math Game
    2) Reading: "cell phone coding"
    3) Have a brief conversation with someone about a town, city, or landmark in MA which you
    might "advertise" in our Massachusetts Travel Guide.
    Tuesday: 1) Social Studies page
    2) Reading: "cell phone coding"
    Wednesday: 1) Social Studies page
    2) Reading: "cell phone coding"
    Thursday: 1) Social Studies page
    2) Reading: "cell phone coding"
    Friday: Read
    for fun! Dance! Sing! Play outside!
    (view changes)
    12:36 pm
  4. page home edited December 5, April 10, 2017 Dear Families, Thank Spring has sprung! I hope you for your h…
    December 5,
    April 10,
    2017
    Dear Families,
    ThankSpring has sprung! I hope you for your help in getting your third grader's Plimoth project safely to school today. Each projectare enjoying the temperate weather this week. Team 1 is unique, and every student clearly worked so hard. Thank you for allhappy to be outside, after our week of rainy weather. Please help your effortschild to support your child!
    Because students have worked so hard
    make a good choice when dressing in the pastnext few daysweeks, as we are likely to finish these projects - and since I'm just returning from twohave some colder days of absence due to illness and assessing what students were able to accomplish - I would like students to read for 30 minutes tonight and 30 minutes tomorrow night. This will likely helpmixed in with the addition of the special evening concert tomorrow!
    Students can "spend" their 30 minutes of reading either: *reading independently, *having an adult read
    warmer days. It might be best to them, or *reading independentlydress in layers, as our heat sometimes doesn't adjust for half the time and being read to for halfweather in the time.
    Thanks
    first warmer days of spring... Thanks so much!Sincerely,Kristin Murphy
    November 27, 2017
    Dear Families,
    I hope you enjoyed the break, and found some time to be with family and friends. I am thankful
    much for the many ways you've supported bothhelping your third grader and me throughout the fall. Idress so appreciatehe or she is comfortable!
    We have been busy in
    the many volunteers wholast few weeks. Our work in Science has centered around our Rocks and Minerals unit. Students have donatedtested "mystery minerals" using scientific tools such as a "streak plate." They completed several tests on six different mystery mineral samples. For example, students learned about the "Mohs Scale of Hardness" by testing their time and expertise, and I wantsample by trying to thank you for your wonderful messages of support throughout the fallscratch it first with a fingernail, then with a penny, and during our conference season. I look forwardlast - if these two tests didn't make a scratch - with a nail (while supervised). They then assigned a number to a productive and healthy December!
    This week, students will be putting
    the finishing touchesmineral sample on their wetu or Pilgrim house projects. I will send home the grading page which I will useMohs scale, to score each student's projects when they come in (next Tuesday, December 5). I very much would likeindicate how hard it was. After students to review this rubric and to make sure that they havecompleted all of the "parts" of their project finished this week. In addition, students this week should write their paragraph about their Pilgrim house or wetu. I'll be sending more specific information regardingtests, we revealed the paragraph tomorrow. If you have any questions regarding this (or any) partcharacteristics of the homework, please feel free to contact me for more information. In addition, this week, I'll be sending two short homework assignments, as students have likely finished a good dealeach mineral and its name. Students guessed which of the work on their building projects. Thanks so much for your support as your third grader finished his or her project!
    Students in November have completed many science lessons! After our exciting science "kick off" on October 30, students have again enjoyed five science lessons. In these lessons, students explored the properties
    mineral samples matched each of water of different temperatures. They made a homemade colored water thermometermy mineral profiles, and used it to measurethey discovered the relative temperatureidentities of water samples. They learned that water expands when heatedall six minerals. We also rehearsed and contracts when cooled. The learned that, just likeperformed a material that floats in water is less dense than"Layers of the water, hot water added to a cupEarth" play. Each student was part of one of room-temperature water rises to the topfour main layers of the cup. Similarly, they experimented to find that, just likeEarth. There was a material that sinks when put into water is more dense than the water, cold ice water added tospeaking part and a cup of room-temperature water sinks tomoving part. We performed the bottom of the cup. Students experimentedplay outdoors, with ice to find that ice cubes were less dense than room-temperature water. Students also prepared two vials with lidsevery layer speaking and moving at once! In addition, students have learned from a scientific syringe (no needle!) withlocal geologist from Wayland. This past week, Dr. Barbara Sheffels, a specific amountresident of water and we froze these containers overnight. The following day, students were surprisedWayland, generously donated her time to find that the vials had "popped their lids" and the syringe's measurement of solid water was greater than the amount of water they had used. The most surprising part of this lesson though, was when we compared a beaker ofvisit every third grade classroom three times. Students learn about what had been 80mL of water that I had frozen overnight (which was in excess of 100 mL of ice with a new beaker of watergeologist does, examined some tools which matched the levela geologist uses during field work, looked at pictures of the ice. Students predicted that the mass of the ice as measured on our balance would be greater than the mass of the new water in the beaker. They were astonished when both the beakers were put on the balanceland forms and solved a puzzle related to the water was heavier! The conversation which ensued was rich with discussionpictures, learned about how ice is less dense,geologists do their work, and reviewed the amountlayers of water that was frozen was less than the new beaker's water (sinceEarth. Dr. Sheffels also helped students to understand the water in the first beaker had only been 80 mLrock cycle and had expanded when frozen), and therefore, the waterthree ways in which rocks are formed, with the new beaker was really more,use of several dynamic pictures and therefore heavier, than the ice beaker. I have been impressed with students' cooperation in these lessons,an arrow chart. Students constructed their discussion,charts, and their enthusiasm!
    Our next lessons will focus on air and water, as they are related
    then used them to weather.
    Our work in math has included learning
    help make good choices about somewhat kind of the properties of multiplication, including the commutative, associative, and distributive properties. This week, we will continuerock was being formed when given a trivia card for Dr. Sheffels' original game (Trivial Pursuit style). It was a fun way to work to solidify students' understanding of these properties, and also name two other propertieslearn about which our class has already talked informally: the zero propertythree kinds of multiplicationrocks, and how one type of rock can be transformed by forces into the identity propertyother two kinds of multiplication. In additionrocks. Students were exctied to this work, students will uselearn about the multiples packets they have completed to find some general patterns about multiplication, including generalizingEarth from a rule about multiplying odd factors, even factors, or an oddprofessional geologist!
    In Reading
    and an even factor.
    This week,
    Writing, students will complete their final Opinion Essay project; this time, students will read a short passagehave learned about Wampanoag and Pilgrim children, and then they willhow to write an essay to tell whether they would prefer to be a Pilgrim childinformational essay, after reading one or a Wampanoag child. Our reading work also centers around Social Studies and Science. Students will finish reading, discussing, and answering questions about Sarah Morton's Day, a work of historical fiction. In addition, students will read some short text to further supplement the lessons they havetwo texts. They learned about water.
    Enjoy
    the week!
    Sincerely,
    Kristin Miurphy
    Oct. 30, 2017
    Dear Families,
    Students enjoyed many special events last week. On Tuesday, we had the fun of visiting the Book Fair. On Thursday, students met
    mnemonic "TIDE" which helps them to organize their Kindergarten Buddies and read their buddiesessays. "T" stands for the books third graders had practiced. I was impressed with both their reading, and their friendliness as they met their new friends.
    Students are working on their next opinion essay during Writing lessons. We have had good and spirited conversations about whether or not students would like
    topic sentence, "I" stands for important ideas, "D" stands for details which help them to be children passengers onexplain the Mayflower,ideas, and we"E" stands for ending. Students have learned about how to find evidencepracticed marking up the text while reading in a textorder to support our opinions. I look forwardfor information to answer a question. They practiced reading to a partner while their compelling reasons aspartner made up gestures which related to the text. Then they finishswitched roles. After taking some notes and organizing their essays.
    Our work
    thinking, students answered the question in Reading has focused on reading for meaning. Students are workingessay form. Last, we used "exemplars" which were scored from 1 to listen4 (4 being the most developed writing) to show students how they could improve their inner voice as they read, and - if they don’t understand what they are reading, to “get a running start” by rereading.essays. Students also have learned how to stop and consider new words. We are reading Sarah Morton’s Day by Kate Waters,communicate the ideas which includes a glossaryrelated to the prompt, how to find the verbs in the back of this book about a real girl who lived at Plimoth Plantation. Students chose four words or phrasesquestion to know what the question was asking them to do, and learned how to learn, sharedplan their choices with a partner, and then withessay using the class. InTIDE mnemonic. They have enjoyed sharing their own writing as well!
    Our work in Cursive handwriting has been exciting
    this way, students previewed this new “colonial” vocabulary beforeweek, as we readhave completed the first halfwhole lower case alphabet! Students will take the last weeks of the story together as a class. Students have learnedyear to ask forlearn the meaning of a new word they encounter in text, or to find its meaning from context. We’ll continue to practice these strategies next week.
    In Math, students enjoyed another “rotation” of Math Stations. They played a special “Math Array War,”
    capital letters, which asked students to match cards to find which student had the highest product,are easily learned after statingall the whole equation associated withlower case practice! Soon, we will have the card. That student took bothfun of the cardswriting in cursive and then students playedknowing every letter!
    Our work in Math in
    the next card. As with the “regular” War card game, occasionally they found thatpast few weeks has involved lessons in both math facts had the same product,Geometry and they both “risked” three cards before turning over their fourth card to compare. In another station, studentsFractions. I have begunchosen to chart multiplesteach these units concurrently (three days of 2, 3, 4fractions per week and higher on a hundreds chart. Theytwo days of Geometry), since the two sets of concepts so directly relate to one another. Students have found that each set of multiples formsbeen involved with solving a pattern; sometimes"Four Triangle Challenge," in which they are arrangedjoined four paper triangles in columns, sometimes in a diagonal,many different ways to try and sometimes in a more interesting pattern. We will continue this work next week. Last, students have been workingfind every possible different polygon. Students worked together to write multiplication stories based on real-life objects. For example, students might choosecheck to write about six cars, each with four wheels, and ask the “solver” ofsee if their problemnewly formed polygons were congruent to findan already-discovered polygon ( learning what the total number of wheels on all ofterm "congruent" means in the cars.process). They have provided an answer key forthen traced these polygons onto large paper and rotated their problems.
    Team 1 is looking forward
    shapes around one vertex (learning the terms "vertex" and "vertices" and "rotation") to our trip to Plimoth Plantation next week on Friday, November 9! If you volunteered to chaperone the trip, please consider yourself "hired!" We take all interested adults; please make sure you have stopped by the office before Friday to be CORIed, so you may join us. Parents will meet us at Plimoth Plantation; we’ll send home a chaperone guide with more details inguessing game for the next few days.whole grade on our bulletin board. Students will return to school beforepassing by must try and guess which of the buses pull in at dismissal.
    The homework schedule this week will be a bit different, due to
    polygons on our special Science Day todaychart made each student's rotation design, and which begins our Water and Weather Unit, and, because I know many families will be enjoying seasonal fun tomorrow night. Please notevertex on that there is no written homework tonight nor tomorrow; instead, please encourage your child to read independently or read together with your child for 30 minutes. I sent home an index card today sopolygon was the vertex around which the students may collect your signature to “certify” that they have read. We will have regular homework on Wednesday, and Thursday.
    Enjoy
    rotated the week!
    Kristin Murphy
    Oct. 23, 2017
    Dear Families,
    *Special Note: Our class' Book Fair time
    polygon. Another project was accidentally left off the list that came homelearning to parents. Our time is Wednesday, Oct. 25 from 10:30-11:00.
    Team 1 enjoyed a fun-filled Pajamas
    fold an origami-style "geometry vocabulary book," during which I taught students several geometric terms, and Stuffed Animal Day on Friday, Oct. 13! I have attached pictures ofthen writing some of our hard working “students” from the day. :) Students who completed the extra credit math project also enjoyed a “math lunch” on Friday, Oct. 20thgeometric terms in the classroom, where we talked about the problem and about math in general!
    This week and last week, students worked on many projects.
    In Writing, we continue to work on opinion essays. This past week, students began to "score" essays, using a scale, as a way
    each of making sure that the important elementsresulting folded "sections" of an opinion essay were represented in each sample. We are revising our writing to include every part, as well as focusing on rich vocabulary (“silver-dollar” words) and sentence variety. I’m excited to see the first final copies finished, andbook. I look forwardhave chosen to helping everyone finish their first essaydo this week. In addition,project each year, beca\use I want students read the book The Mayflower by Mark Greenwood, and began to look in the text for ideasreally WANT to help them answer this question: Would you likeopen up their accordion-style origami book to be a child sailing onfind the Mayflower? I look forward tomeaning of their responses!
    In Reading, we are rehearsing our Reader's Theater play; we'll record it this week. We are
    terms. Students also eagerly anticipating our first “Kindergarten Buddy” reading visit. Thanksused a set of fifteen quadrilaterals to every family for your assistance in helping your children get additional “out-loud” reading practice at home. Thanks also to families for helping studentssolve several Riddles, with three or four clues. They narrowed down their “Making 10” Reading Menu. Many students expressed their excitement about going toquadrilateral cards with the Wayland Libraryaddition of each clue, and gettingfinally ended with one card - the children’s librarian, Pam McCue, to sign"mystery quadrilateral." Students will continue this week with this project by writing their menu!
    This week, we also began
    own riddles. Our fraction work in our more formal spelling groups. Students are working to identify patterns in words in order to “sort” words into related groups. I enjoyed hearing about the many different waysincluded a fantastic "Fraction Museum!" Groups of two or three students had sorted the same setfun folding string into equal fractional parts, pouring colored water into cups to represent their fraction exhibit's fraction, folding construction paper of words.various sizes, and splitting up homemade playdough into equal parts. We have been practicing these words daily in different ways.
    During our Math work in the past few weeks,
    then displayed each exhibit (the halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths, eighths, tenths...) and students learned a simple five-step problem-solving process: Understandwalked around the problem by picturing it in your mind while readingmuseum, drawing and writing an answer statement; Starcompleting related work - noticing the "star"relative size of the problem and find out what he or she is doing; Chunk the problem by finding important information and draw a bar model or other picture; Compute; and Check your work. Studentseach fraction! We have practiced solving one-step additionalso made our own "fraction strips" for comparing fractions, and subtraction problems and this week worked on solving two-step problems. In addition, we took our Place Value assessmentare beginning to draw and began our Multiplication Unit.
    During Social Studies lessons,
    use number lines with fractions. Soon, we have been learning more about the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag nation they encountered when they came to the New World. Our first field trip will beenjoy a trip to Plimoth Plantationbean bag game with fractions on Thursday, November 9. On this field trip, we typically invite all interested parents as chaperones. Becausea number line and bowls and cups of tight space onvarious sizes!
    Our Social Studies study has involved locating
    the bus, we request that parents caravan with us in cars (carpooling is an option). If you are interested in chaperoning, please take carevarious major rivers, mountains, reservoirs, cities, towns, bodies of any CORI preparations with the main office this week. Thanks so much!
    Special Requests:
    *Please could you help your third grader to get his or her homework back into the homework folder
    water, and into the backpack which travels to school? Many students this past week have told me that they did their work, but left it at home. I’ll contact parents directly if your child has not turned in homework twice or more during the week, but it would be so helpful if you could help the homework leap into bags, after students work to finish it. Thanks so much!
    *Please return your child's permission slip and fee early this week. I've returned a few checks which had amounts
    other than the student fee ($25) or the student-plus-chaperone fee ($46). Thanks so much for returning a check with these amounts!
    And, as always, thanks so much for all you do for your third grader!
    Sincerely,
    Kristin Murphy
    Oct. 10, 2017
    Dear Families,
    I hope you enjoyed a long
    physical and refreshing weekend! Team 1 has been working diligentlypolitical features on many projects! One project our whole class has worked on together is to respect people’s right to answer without otherMassachusetts maps. I was thrilled with how students interjecting during the time another student is answering a question. We’ve also improved our attention during class discussions. To that end, we are almost readyused their "quiz kits" to celebrate our successpractice each location - with a pajama and stuffed animal day! More details to come, as soon as we meet our goal!
    I want to devote
    many times the spellings for extra credit! Students' work on their tests was superb! We did this week’s newsletter to talking about some research about reading. Coming home with your child today (on green paper) is s short graph which details the importancebackground work, and the benefit of reading for just twenty minutes per day. Research suggests that the morenow we are reading Nicholas: A Massachusetts Tale, which is a child does each day, the better skill they develop when reading. Childrenfictional story of Nicholas, a mouse who read only 5 minutes per day score at about the 50th percentile, while children who read just 20 minutes per day score at the 90th percentile. Being read to, as well as reading oneself, also brings these benefits. Any sports team would agree that the more time the team devotesembarks on a quest across Massachusetts to practicing a skill,get the more likely they are to be able to use that skillonly other copy of his mouse family's family diary from his uncle, after his family's diary is destroyed in a game. So, it is no surprise that this effect (calledflood in the research “The Matthew Effect”) holds true for reading skills. Thanks so much for your help in finding just 20 minutes a day for reading time.
    Other reading research has found that the more libraries from which a child borrows books, the better
    their reading skill. So, a child choosing from a classroom library, a school library, and a public library branch will likely be a better reader than a child who only chooses from oneStockbridge, MA home (or none). Becauseshould I would love my students to continue to progress as readers, I ask you to please help your child to bring back his/her school library books from home each Friday. I arrive atsay, hole!). Not surprisingly, the class’ Library class ten minutes before it is donejourney takes him to advertise some special “book picks” which I “sell” to interested students. My goal is for each child to take out three books per week fromseveral important landmarks (I enjoyed hearing students pipe up excitedly that they knew where these landmarks were, after their school library. I would also LOVE each child to take out books from the public library just twice per month. I know how tight schedules are - having two activetest!), and busy childrenimparts important history of my own - but I would love your help in getting school library books in the bagMassachusetts. Nicholas also meets several animal friends on Fridays and having students visit the public library twice per month (or more). Thanks so much for your partnership!
    This week, students will pick a picture
    way, making this book to practice readingfun for his/her “Kindergarten buddy.” Our third graders seem thrilled at the prospect of being the “big buddy” for the first time. This week, students will practice reading their chosen book OUT LOUD for at least 15 minutes. Thanks so much for finding just a few moments to listen to your child read.
    Enjoy the week!
    Sincerely,
    Kristin Murphy
    Oct. 2, 2017
    Dear Families,
    Students have been working hard on many projects. I am sure we will appreciate the more seasonal temperatures this week! Please let me know by tomorrow (Tuesday, 10/3) if you would NOT like
    me to share your emailread, with our room parent, Ms. Spilman. Thanks so much!
    In Writing,
    different animal voices!
    Another job
    we continue to work on opinion essays. Studentshave done this week will beginis to write Massachusetts Travel Guide entries, weighing inbecome familiar with how to take the online MCAS test on their pick for the best place to visit in Massachusetts. Alsocomputer, which students will begin to "score" essays, using a scale, as a way of making sure that the important elements of an opinion essay whichdo when they have learned about in previous lessonsreturn from April vacation. Our English/Language Arts testing days are represented in each sample. I’ll be excited to see the first final copies finished,Wednesday, Thursday, and look forward to helping everyone finish their first essay this inFriday after the coming week or two.
    In Reading this week, we will rehearsing our Reader's Theater play,
    break (4/26, 4/27, and we'll record it this week. We will choose books4/28). I ask parents that - as always - you help your child get to practice reading aloud to our Kindergarten buddies, and begin to practicebed at school - reading it alone and then aloud to sticker partners. We will also been working in small spelling groups.
    In our Math work this past week, students reviewed the strategies they learned for addition, learned and practiced the “trade first” (U.S. historically-taught) algorithm for addition, and learned and practiced the number line strategy for solving subtraction problems. In addition to some more addition and subtraction work, students this week will learn
    a simple five-step problem-solving process: Understand the problem by picturing it in your mind while readingreasonable hour and writing an answer statement; Star the "star" of the problem and find out what he or she is doing; “Chunk” the problem by finding important information and draweat a bar model or other picture; Compute; and Check your work. Students will practice solving one-step addition and subtraction problems.
    This week, we’ll also have the fun of beginning our first Science unit in earnest! Students will begin a “I Know…,
    good breakfast before each day next week. I “Think I Know…”, I Want to Know chart to prepare them before they begin lessons.
    Thanks so much for all you do for your third grader!
    Sincerely,
    Kristin Murphy
    Sept. 25, 2017
    Dear Families,
    Students have been working on many projects this past week! We began our first social studies unit - learning about the Pilgrims' journey to the New World, the native nations they met,
    talked today with a focus on the Wampanoag,students and the relationship between the two groups. We read the book Three Young Pilgrims, which chronicles one family's experience astold them that they sailed on the Mayflowerwere ready, and began their life inreminded them that many fourth graders have taken the New World. This week, we will continue reading togethertest last year - and discussing some picture books to helpHAVE LIVED TO TELL ABOUT IT! I had students get an idealaughing at my silly recounting about what it would be likehow some students even whispered to travel onme after the Mayflowertest that they actually LIKED it. Please remind your child that they are ready, and tryonly need to begin a life as winter in Massachusetts began. We will also begindo their best to learn aboutcomplete the Wampanoag, their lives in the New World before and after the Pilgrims' arrival, and how the two groups related to one another. This week's homework will helpwork. Our tests this year are untimed, so students to extend their learningmay relax and prepare for our next Social Studies lessons. Thank you for helping your third grader make a half an hour available in orderhave enough time to complete the homework and get it backwork to the backpack!
    In Reading, we have been learning about how building reading stamina makes us better readers (and therefore makes us happier to read!). We practiced collecting our books to read, settling into our places, and reading without distraction or interruption.
    best of their ability. Students suggested ways that we could avoid distracting themselves or others around them, building a list of strategies. We then - read! We collected data on fivewill take the Math sections of the days, and learned about line graphstest in the process, which best measure how data changes over time. On the first day, everyone in the class read for a little more than 16 minutes before some students were distracted or interrupted. The second day, we faltered and read for 7 minutes before someone was distracted. The third day, we reached 18 minutes, after a discussion about how to rebound. The next day, students read for 13 minutes without distraction. The last day, we read in excessweek of 30 minutes, which makes quite a spike on our line graph! Bravo, Team 1!
    In our “Reader’s Theater,” we read and enjoyed Maya Angelou’s poem “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me.” This week, we will begin
    May.
    Last, I want
    to work to improve our fluency by practicing our first "reader's theater" play, which iswish a folktale called "The Calabash Kids." Students will practice their parts beginning this week, and we may soon be readyHappy Passover to record our play - complete with student sound effects.
    Students have been learning about how to write a strong opinion essay during Writing periods this week. They used what they learned as last week our class wrote a class essay on which kind of ant was the hardest-working ant. This week,
    students who celebrate. There will write notes (in short "cave man" form)be no homework tonight, due to help them write their first draft of an opinion essay to answer the question, "Which is the Best Place to Visit in Massachusetts?” We aim to publish our final essays in a Class "Travel Guide!" Students also had a moment last week to read the letterholiday. I wrote back to them and then to write back to me in their "Write Back" book.
    Our math work this past week has been focused on place value, on writing numbers in standard, word, and expanded form, and on rounding to the nearest ten and hundred. This week we
    will review the "partial sums" algorithm for addition of three-digit numbers, and learn the US historically-taught algorithm (we call it the "trading" or "regrouping" method,assign homework Tuesday through Thursday nights, but if you went to school in the United States, you likely called this algorithm "carrying,"families who celebrate tomorrow night as did I, when I was in third grade.) I like to make a game out of the trading (which also cements the trading imagery in students' minds)well may just let me know by having volunteers race up to the front document camera, grab onesnote or tensemail that they will be celebrating, and race back to the "bank of Murphy" to exchange ten ones for one ten, or ten tens for one hundred. We are sure towe can make a fair amount of noise cheering on the runners!
    Thanks
    other arrangements.
    Again, thanks so much
    for all
    ...
    your third graders! Please take a moment and read my fourth "Reading Secrets Revealed" page (listed in the email I sent, or listed at the left on my website. Enjoy the week.grader!
    Sincerely,
    Kristin Murphy

    (view changes)
    12:33 pm

Wednesday, January 3

  1. page This Week's Homework edited ... Homework for the week of Dec. 4 Monday - Finish your Plimoth project! January 2-5: Tuesd…
    ...
    Homework for the week of Dec. 4
    Monday - Finish your Plimoth project!
    January 2-5:
    Tuesday - ReadMissing Side Area homework
    Read
    for 30 minutes.fun
    Wednesday - ReadPerimeter homework
    Read
    for 30 minutes.fun
    Thursday - Please write a letter of appreciation to an adult - a teacher, a parent, or another mentor. Use the template page that you began in class. Next, use the editing page to make sure you have corrected any mistakes and done your best work. Put your name on both pages and bring them in tomorrow.
    Team 1's Homework
    Area/Perimeter homework
    Read
    for the week of Nov. 27
    Monday -
    1) Work on your Plimoth structure project (Due Tues., Dec. 5)
    2) Choose one page of the math work. (Due tomorrow - Nov. 28)
    Tuesday -
    1) Work on your Plimoth structure project (Due Tues., Dec. 5)
    2) Read for at least 15 minutes. Have an adult sign your reading page to say you have read.
    Wednesday -
    1) Work on your Plimoth structure project (Due Tues., Dec. 5)
    2) Read for at least 15 minutes. Have an adult sign your reading page to say you have read.
    Thursday -
    1) Work on your Plimoth structure project (Due Tues., Dec. 5)
    2) Choose one page of the math work. (Due tomorrow
    fun
    Friday
    - Nov. 28)no homework
    Team 1’s Homework for the week of Oct. 23rd
    Extra Credit - Complete the writing prompt about our Bats passage!
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    6:09 am

Wednesday, December 6

  1. page This Week's Homework edited ... Tuesday - Read for 30 minutes. Wednesday - Read for 30 minutes. Thursday - cursive handwrit…
    ...
    Tuesday - Read for 30 minutes.
    Wednesday - Read for 30 minutes.
    Thursday - cursive handwriting finish up workPlease write a letter of appreciation to an adult - a teacher, a parent, or another mentor. Use the template page that you began in class. Next, use the editing page to make sure you have corrected any mistakes and done your best work. Put your name on both pages and bring them in tomorrow.
    Team 1's Homework for the week of Nov. 27
    Monday -
    (view changes)
    9:33 am

Tuesday, December 5

  1. page This Week's Homework edited Team 1's Homework for the week of Dec. 4 Monday - Finish your Plimoth project! Tuesday - Read fo…
    Team 1's Homework for the week of Dec. 4
    Monday - Finish your Plimoth project!
    Tuesday - Read for 30 minutes.
    Wednesday - Read for 30 minutes.
    Thursday - cursive handwriting finish up work

    Team 1's Homework for the week of Nov. 27
    Monday -
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    12:24 pm
  2. page home edited December 5, 2017 Dear Families, Thank you for your help in getting your third grader's Plimoth p…
    December 5, 2017
    Dear Families,
    Thank you for your help in getting your third grader's Plimoth project safely to school today. Each project is unique, and every student clearly worked so hard. Thank you for all of your efforts to support your child!
    Because students have worked so hard in the past few days to finish these projects - and since I'm just returning from two days of absence due to illness and assessing what students were able to accomplish - I would like students to read for 30 minutes tonight and 30 minutes tomorrow night. This will likely help with the addition of the special evening concert tomorrow!
    Students can "spend" their 30 minutes of reading either: *reading independently, *having an adult read to them, or *reading independently for half the time and being read to for half the time.
    Thanks so much!Sincerely,Kristin Murphy

    November 27, 2017
    Dear Families,
    (view changes)
    12:23 pm

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